Yutanpo Shirane, a new free, sensual and feminine figuration

Women have been represented by other women in many different ways in Japanese literature, from the current love novels of Hiromi Kawakami to the feminist poetry of Murasaki Shikibu of the 11th century. But in all their writings, a term common is always used: sensitivity. The artist and illustrator Yutanpo Shirane, a reference within the sector for more than 30 years in Japan, knows how to capture the new Japanese femininity with the same delicacy as Kaneko Misuzu's verses. His work is full of free, sensual, independent and naturally powerful women, represented by simple lines and a sober color palette.

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Women have been represented by other women in many different ways in Japanese literature, from the current love novels of Hiromi Kawakami to the feminist poetry of Murasaki Shikibu of the 11th century. But in all their writings, a term common is always used: sensitivity. The artist and illustrator Yutanpo Shirane, a reference within the sector for more than 30 years in Japan, knows how to capture the new Japanese femininity with the same delicacy as Kaneko Misuzu's verses. His work is full of free, sensual, independent and naturally powerful women, represented by simple lines and a sober color palette.

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Wakaru, the illustrated positivism that comes from Japan

A Japanese proverb says that “spending time laughing is like spending time with the gods”. And this is also the summary of the work of the Japanese artist Wakaru, who launches a message of optimism and color with this exhibition at Gunter Gallery. Illustrated positivism is the term that best defines the work of this creator who walks through a type of figuration of naive aesthetics but powerful in the handling of color and the costumbrism of her scenes. Her pictorial style is based on simple lines and “smiling faces”, according to the artist herself.

In recent years Wakaru has crossed the barrier of contemporary art, exhibiting in galleries such as Akrilyc or The Waluso Gallery in London (United Kingdom) or Tokyo Pixel in Japan.

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A Japanese proverb says that “spending time laughing is like spending time with the gods”. And this is also the summary of the work of the Japanese artist Wakaru, who launches a message of optimism and color with this exhibition at Gunter Gallery. Illustrated positivism is the term that best defines the work of this creator who walks through a type of figuration of naive aesthetics but powerful in the handling of color and the costumbrism of her scenes. Her pictorial style is based on simple lines and “smiling faces”, according to the artist herself.

In recent years Wakaru has crossed the barrier of contemporary art, exhibiting in galleries such as Akrilyc or The Waluso Gallery in London (United Kingdom) or Tokyo Pixel in Japan.

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Boris Hoppek, the invisible borders and their heroes

More than 82 million people, by the end of 2020, had been forcibly displaced from their countries due to persecution, conflict, violence or human rights violations, according to UNHCR. One in 95 people in the world have been forced to flee their homes due to war or discrimination. The artist Boris Hoppek (Berlin, 1970) has been working around these terrible figures for years. Immigration and racism are an inseparable part of his work, which he analyzes from works that range from site-specific to illustration, photography or collage. In this exhibition he returns to use his famous character Bimbo, a black figure with red lips, his most recognizable icon, to tell this story of social criticism and denunciation.

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More than 82 million people, by the end of 2020, had been forcibly displaced from their countries due to persecution, conflict, violence or human rights violations, according to UNHCR. One in 95 people in the world have been forced to flee their homes due to war or discrimination. The artist Boris Hoppek (Berlin, 1970) has been working around these terrible figures for years. Immigration and racism are an inseparable part of his work, which he analyzes from works that range from site-specific to illustration, photography or collage. In this exhibition he returns to use his famous character Bimbo, a black figure with red lips, his most recognizable icon, to tell this story of social criticism and denunciation.

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'Made by mud and air', the new exhibition by Mercedes Bellido

With the title of ‘De barro y aire’ (Made by mud and air), the artist Mercedes Bellido will be the guest creator of this awaited live exhibition. She will present a series of unique still life pieces that reflect different types of traditional ceramics around the world. In the words of the artist, in these porcelains “the action takes place within the clay itself; the butterflies that surround the ceramic pieces are psychopompos that contain the souls or the vital essence of each one of these figures, because porcelain is something stopped in time”. Formed in the classrooms of the Faculty of Fine Arts of Cuenca, a place marked by the abstraction of artists such as Antonio Saura or Fernando Zóbel, Mercedes Bellido (Zaragoza, 1991) is one of the new promises of contemporary painting in Spain. 

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With the title of ‘De barro y aire’ (Made by mud and air), the artist Mercedes Bellido will be the guest creator of this awaited live exhibition. She will present a series of unique still life pieces that reflect different types of traditional ceramics around the world. In the words of the artist, in these porcelains “the action takes place within the clay itself; the butterflies that surround the ceramic pieces are psychopompos that contain the souls or the vital essence of each one of these figures, because porcelain is something stopped in time”. Formed in the classrooms of the Faculty of Fine Arts of Cuenca, a place marked by the abstraction of artists such as Antonio Saura or Fernando Zóbel, Mercedes Bellido (Zaragoza, 1991) is one of the new promises of contemporary painting in Spain. 

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This is ‘Rome’, the bravest Sanz i Vila’s exhibition

This is Rome. A set of artworks where violence, pain and death are offered in the form of a spectacle, all of them merge with Sanz i Vila’s cheerful color palette. Ten exclusive and original pieces that represent a creative milestone for the Gunter Gallery’s artist, in which movement and strength are channeled through the fight of these gladiators. "This work brings us to a balance in order to forget horror for an instant and observe, as the Romans themselves did at the time, suffering as simple visual pleasure". The work of Sanz i Vila is one of the most recognizable in the spectrum of European illustrators, always working with yellow, pink and blue as the only three colors, to which, in rarely ocasions, he adds the outline of black. It is an optimistic and genderless work, between new pop and realism, a contemporary figuration that, in this exhibition, Rome, speaks of the reality of our time through gladiators from the 1st century BC.

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This is Rome. A set of artworks where violence, pain and death are offered in the form of a spectacle, all of them merge with Sanz i Vila’s cheerful color palette. Ten exclusive and original pieces that represent a creative milestone for the Gunter Gallery’s artist, in which movement and strength are channeled through the fight of these gladiators. "This work brings us to a balance in order to forget horror for an instant and observe, as the Romans themselves did at the time, suffering as simple visual pleasure". The work of Sanz i Vila is one of the most recognizable in the spectrum of European illustrators, always working with yellow, pink and blue as the only three colors, to which, in rarely ocasions, he adds the outline of black. It is an optimistic and genderless work, between new pop and realism, a contemporary figuration that, in this exhibition, Rome, speaks of the reality of our time through gladiators from the 1st century BC.

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'City dawns', by Sr García on freedom and domestic refuge

This is the first virtual exhibition in Spain curated by Gunter Gallery. Sr. García is the artist invited to reflect on confinement and freedom, the need for communication and the domestic refuge. "I have counted each day, crossing the calendar with a red pencil one after another. I have seen how birds fly, sound, sing, breeze, sound, trees… since dawn with that same red color. No matter the hours, they marked the rhythm, with the numbers crossed out. One rhythm, and the luck of listening to them", explains the man who is the best contemporary collagist in Spain. These pieces, where the creator mixes different techniques, talks about brotherhood, open fields, humanity. An artwork that opens up a new creative path in Sr. García's career, closer to the contemporary and the pictorial.

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This is the first virtual exhibition in Spain curated by Gunter Gallery. Sr. García is the artist invited to reflect on confinement and freedom, the need for communication and the domestic refuge. "I have counted each day, crossing the calendar with a red pencil one after another. I have seen how birds fly, sound, sing, breeze, sound, trees… since dawn with that same red color. No matter the hours, they marked the rhythm, with the numbers crossed out. One rhythm, and the luck of listening to them", explains the man who is the best contemporary collagist in Spain. These pieces, where the creator mixes different techniques, talks about brotherhood, open fields, humanity. An artwork that opens up a new creative path in Sr. García's career, closer to the contemporary and the pictorial.

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